Sprint’s Cache Only Nameservers

Sprint maintains two sets of DNS servers. The first functions as Authoritative (non-recursive), and the second functions as Cache-Only (recursive). The Cache Only servers can be used by customer host machines to perform general DNS. You can put the IP addresses in the client machines on your network if you do not have your own Internet nameserver. I committed one of these three addresses to memory a decade ago (you never know when you might need it!). Google Public DNS server addresses are alot easier to memorize (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4), but I like the stability of these Sprintlink servers.

NS1.SPRINTLINK.NET, 204.117.214.10, USA/Europe/Asia
NS2.SPRINTLINK.NET, 199.2.252.10, USA/Europe/Asia
NS3.SPRINTLINK.NET, 204.97.212.10, USA/Europe/Asia

https://www.sprint.net/index.php?p=faq_dns

Google DNS

Link:

Why Google Public DNS?

As web pages become more complex and include more resources from multiple origin domains, clients need to perform multiple DNS lookups to render a single page. The average Internet user performs hundreds of DNS lookups each day, slowing down his or her browsing experience. As the web continues to grow, greater load is placed on existing DNS infrastructure.

Since Google’s search engine already crawls the web on a daily basis and in the process resolves and caches DNS information, we wanted to leverage our technology to experiment with new ways of addressing some of the existing DNS challenges around performance and security. We are offering the service to the public in the hope of achieving the following aims:

Provide end users with an alternative to their current DNS service. Google Public DNS takes some new approaches that we believe offer more valid results, increased security, and, in most cases, better performance.
Help reduce the load on ISPs’ DNS servers. By taking advantage of our global data-center and caching infrastructure, we can directly serve large numbers of user requests without having to query other DNS resolvers.
Help make the web faster and more secure. We are launching this experimental service to test some new ways to approach DNS-related challenges. We hope to share what we learn with developers of DNS resolvers and the broader web community and get their feedback.