My issue.net file

/etc/issue.net is announced at the beginning of an SSH session. I put the following in my issue.net file to scare off any naughty guests.

***************************************************************************
NOTICE TO USERS This computer system is the private property of its owner, whether
individual, corporate or government. It is for authorized use only.
Users (authorized or unauthorized) have no explicit or implicit
expectation of privacy. Any or all uses of this system and all files on this system may be
intercepted, monitored, recorded, copied, audited, inspected, and
disclosed to your employer, to authorized site, government, and law
enforcement personnel, as well as authorized officials of government
agencies, both domestic and foreign. By using this system, the user consents to such interception, monitoring,
recording, copying, auditing, inspection, and disclosure at the
discretion of such personnel or officials. Unauthorized or improper use
of this system may result in civil and criminal penalties and
administrative or disciplinary action, as appropriate. By continuing to
use this system you indicate your awareness of and consent to these terms
and conditions of use. LOG OFF IMMEDIATELY if you do not agree to the
conditions stated in this warning.
****************************************************************************

Google DNS

Link:

Why Google Public DNS?

As web pages become more complex and include more resources from multiple origin domains, clients need to perform multiple DNS lookups to render a single page. The average Internet user performs hundreds of DNS lookups each day, slowing down his or her browsing experience. As the web continues to grow, greater load is placed on existing DNS infrastructure.

Since Google’s search engine already crawls the web on a daily basis and in the process resolves and caches DNS information, we wanted to leverage our technology to experiment with new ways of addressing some of the existing DNS challenges around performance and security. We are offering the service to the public in the hope of achieving the following aims:

Provide end users with an alternative to their current DNS service. Google Public DNS takes some new approaches that we believe offer more valid results, increased security, and, in most cases, better performance.
Help reduce the load on ISPs’ DNS servers. By taking advantage of our global data-center and caching infrastructure, we can directly serve large numbers of user requests without having to query other DNS resolvers.
Help make the web faster and more secure. We are launching this experimental service to test some new ways to approach DNS-related challenges. We hope to share what we learn with developers of DNS resolvers and the broader web community and get their feedback.

Ubuntu Wallpapers

Link:

Ubuntu’s got two all-new looks, dark and light, for its upcoming 10.04 release, and a whole new set of accompanying wallpapers. You don’t need a Linux desktop to enjoy the stunning photography or ambient renderings—just this download.

Changing Servers

I’ve outgrown my webserver! I’ve been using an OpenVZ virtual private server through Network Redux out in Portland, Oregon. A friend recommended CoreNetworks.net located in East Lansing, Michigan. CoreNetworks.net has a dedicated server package that is quite affordable with many upgrades to what I currently have. Check out the comparison.

Network Redux VPS:

Debian 5.0
OpenVZ Hypervisor
256MB RAM
10GB Hard Drive
500 GB Transfer

CoreNetworks.net dedicated server:

Ubuntu Server 9.10
Intel 2.66GHz Processor
2048MB RAM
80GB Hard Drive
1,000 GB Transfer

Also, I’m going to have 3 public IP addresses to distribute among a few virtual machines that I’ll run. Maybe I’ll start using the server for something more than just web services.

Moving WordPress

Because of my change to tumblr, I had to move my old site to a temporary location while I copy content over. Here’s the SQL I ran to update the blog’s new domain information.

UPDATE wp_posts SET guid = replace(guid, ‘http://www.old-domain.com’,’http://www.new-domain.com’);

UPDATE wp_posts SET post_content = replace(post_content, ‘http://www.old-domain.com’, ‘http://www.new-domain.com’);

http://codex.wordpress.org/Moving_WordPress

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2007/10/01/how-to-move-wordpress-blog-to-new-domain-or-location/