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sensitive fern (Onoclea sensibilis)

Onoclea sensibilis, the sensitive fern, also known as the bead fern, is a coarse-textured, medium to large-sized deciduous perennial fern. The name comes from the observation by early American settlers that it was very sensitive to frost, the fronds dying quickly when first touched by it. It is sometimes treated as the only species in Onoclea, but some authors do not consider the genus monotypic.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104481300

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hexagonal-pored polypore (Neofavolus alveolaris)

Neofavolus alveolaris is a species of polypore fungus in the family Polyporaceae. It is widely distributed in the temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Its kidney- or fan-shaped fruit bodies measure 1–8 cm (0.4–3.1 in) in diameter. Initially reddish, they become cream to white when dry. The pores on the cap underside are angular to hexagonal and relatively large (0.5–3 mm diameter). The fungus causes a white rot in hardwoods.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104481168

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violet-toothed polypore (Trichaptum biforme)

Trichaptum biforme is a species of poroid fungus in the order Hymenochaetales. It is a saprobe that decomposes hardwood stumps and logs.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480998

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delicate fern moss (Thuidium delicatulum)

Thuidium delicatulum, also known as delicate thuidium moss, is a species of moss in the family Thuidiaceae. It is found in North and South America from Alaska to Brazil.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480869

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broom moss (Dicranum scoparium)

Dicranum scoparium, the broom forkmoss, is a species of dicranid moss, native to North America, including the Great Lakes region. It usually forms tufts or mats on soil in dry to moist forested areas. As with many types of moss Broom moss grows in clumps with Broom mosses as well as other mosses. It can be distinguished by its leaves, which strongly curve to one side.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480769

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sawbrier (Smilax glauca)

Smilax glauca, the cat greenbriar or catbriar is a woody vine in the family Smilacaceae. It is native to central and eastern portions of the United States, where it is a common and conspicuous part of the forest vegetation. It is also common across much of Mexico.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480724

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Jelly Ear (Auricularia auricula-judae)

Auricularia auricula-judae, known as the Jew’s ear, wood ear, jelly ear or by a number of other common names, is a species of edible Auriculariales fungus found worldwide. The fruiting body is distinguished by its noticeably ear-like shape and brown colouration; it grows upon wood, especially elder. Its specific epithet is derived from the belief that Judas Iscariot hanged himself from an elder tree; the common name “Judas’s ear” eventually became “Jew’s ear”, w

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480508

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Peeling Oysterling (Crepidotus mollis)

Crepidotus mollis is a species of mushroom. The common names of the species is soft slipper and jelly crep.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104480447

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Collared Calostoma (Calostoma lutescens)

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104117446

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Pear-shaped Puffball (Apioperdon pyriforme)

Apioperdon pyriforme commonly known as the pear-shaped puffball or stump puffball, is a saprobic fungus present throughout much of the world. Emerging in autumn, this puffball is common and abundant on decaying logs of both deciduous and coniferous wood. It is considered a choice edible when still immature and the inner flesh is white. It is often called Lycoperdon pyriforme, but was transferred to Apioperdon in 2017 based on phylogenetic an

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/104116276