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Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Petersburg, Virginia

Westover Avenue House Fire

This house along the 1600 block of Westover Avenue in Petersburg caught fire on February 19, 2018.

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Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Gallery: Rail transport Petersburg, Virginia

Norfolk Southern overpass in Ivor

Single-lane wooden Norfolk Southern overpass on Sadler Road in Ivor, VA

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Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Gallery: Tech Junk Petersburg, Virginia

Small cell facility in Walnut Hill

“Small cell facility” means a wireless facility that meets both of the following qualifications: (i) each antenna is located inside an enclosure of no more than six cubic feet in volume, or in the case of an antenna that has exposed elements, the antenna and all of its exposed elements could fit within an imaginary enclosure of no more than six cubic feet and (ii) all other wireless equipment associated with the facility is cumulatively no more than 28 cubic feet in volume, or facilities comprised of such higher limits as established by the Federal Communications Commission. The following types of associated equipment are not included in the calculation of equipment volume: electric meter, concealment, telecommunications demarcation boxes, back-up power systems, grounding equipment, power transfer switches, cut-off switches, and vertical cable runs for the connection of power and other services.

There is now a small cell facility in Walnut Hill (Petersburg, Virginia) on a utility pole alongside West Tuckahoe Street.

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Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Petersburg, Virginia Photography

July 23, 2016 in Petersburg

Random pictures taken on July 23, 2016 in Petersburg, Virginia. #badPhotography

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Gallery: Nature Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Petersburg, Virginia

Those crape myrtles

I’m going to have to prune my crape myrtles next year…

photo

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Dinwiddie, Virginia Gallery: Aerial photography Gallery: AT&T Long Lines Gallery: Dinwiddie County, Virginia Video

Aerial of Cherry Hill, Virginia – February 2014

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Gallery: Aerial photography Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Petersburg, Virginia

Petersburg, Virginia on January 29, 2014

Petersburg

(Click to enlarge)

1/29/2014 max temperature: 30 degrees F.
1/29/2014 min temperature: 10 degrees F.

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Gallery: Aerial photography Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Petersburg, Virginia Video

Aerial of Walnut Hill in Petersburg, Virginia – January 2014

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Gallery: Nature Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Gardening Home Improvement Petersburg, Virginia

Cherry trees

The Weeping Cherry Tree on March 31, 2013:

Weeping Cherry Tree Weeping Cherry Tree

The Yoshino Cherry on April 16, 2013:

Cherry Tree Cherry Tree

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Gallery: Petersburg, Virginia Gallery: Rail transport Petersburg, Virginia

Petersburg Collier Connection project site

The Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT) is working with Norfolk Southern, CSX and Amtrak to extend Richmond’s Amtrak Virginia regional service, which began in July 2010, to Norfolk. When complete, residents in and around Norfolk will have a one-seat ride from Norfolk as far north as Boston. The estimated start date for this new service is 2013.

More details:

  • DRPT, Norfolk Southern and CSX are working together to coordinate work at the Petersburg Collier Connection project site.
  • CSX has submitted design plans of the Petersburg Collier Connection to DRPT for review and comment for the Norfolk Southern connector track. The internal DRPT review is complete and the Agency is ready to issue a Notice To Proceed for construction.
  • All grading work on the Norfolk Southern segment of the Collier Connection is complete. Subbalast and ballast has been placed, and Norfolk Southern track work is close to completion. Final track elevation adjustments will be made upon completion of the CSX connection work.

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Dinwiddie, Virginia Gallery: Dinwiddie County, Virginia

Dewitt Fire Lookout

A retired fire lookout (observation) tower in Dewitt, Virginia.

Coordinates: 37.042014, -77.639823

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The history of fire lookout towers predates the United States Forest Service (which was founded in 1905). Many townships, private lumber companies, and State Foresty organizations operated fire lookout towers on their own accord.

In 1933, during the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt formed the “Civilian Conservation Corps” consisting of young men and veterans of World War One. It was during this time that the CCC set about building fire lookout towers, and access roads to those towers. The U.S. Forest Service took great advantage of the CCC workforce and initiated a massive program of construction projects, including fire lookout towers. In California alone, some 250 lookout towers and cabs were built by CCC workers between 1933 and 1942.

The golden age of fire lookout towers was from 1930 through 1950. During World War II, the Aircraft Warning Service was established, operating in 1942 and 1943. Fire lookouts were assigned additional duty as Enemy Aircraft Spotters, especially on the West Coast of the United States.

From the 1960’s through the 1990’s the towers took a back seat to new technology, aircraft, and improvements in radios. The promise of space satellite fire detection and modern cell phones tried to compete with the remaining fire lookout towers but in several environments, the technology failed.