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Small Chanterelle (Cantharellus minor)

Cantharellus minor is a fungus native to eastern North America. It is one of the smallest of the genus Cantharellus, which includes other edible chanterelles. It is suspected of being mycorrhizal, found in association with oaks and moss. Recently, C. minor has been reported from semi-evergreen to evergreen forests in the Western Ghats, Kerala, India forming ectomycorrhizal associations with tree species like Vateria indica, Diospyros malabarica, Hopea

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95178970

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iNaturalist

Ochre Jelly Club (Leotia lubrica)

Leotia lubrica, commonly referred to as a jelly baby, is a species of fungus in the family Leotiaceae. The species produces small fruit bodies up to 6 centimetres (2.4 in) in height, featuring a “head” and a stalk. Ochre with tints of olive-green, the heads are irregularly shaped, while the stalk, of a similar colour, attaches them to the ground. The appearance can be somewhat variable and is similar to a number of other species, including Cudonia…

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95178797

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iNaturalist

birch polypore (Fomitopsis betulina)

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95178223

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iNaturalist

The Goblet (Pseudoclitocybe cyathiformis)

Pseudoclitocybe cyathiformis, commonly known as the goblet funnel cap, is a species of fungus in the Tricholomataceae family, and the type species of the genus Pseudoclitocybe. It was first described scientifically as Agaricus cyathiformis by Jean Baptiste François Pierre Bulliard in 1786, and later transferred to the genus Pseudoclitocybe by Rolf Singer in 1956. The fungus is found in North America and Europe.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/94852109

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iNaturalist

Fairy Fingers (Clavaria fragilis)

Clavaria fragilis, commonly known as fairy fingers, white worm coral, or white spindles, is a species of fungus in the family Clavariaceae. It is synonymous with Clavaria vermicularis. The fungus is the type species of the genus Clavaria and is a typical member of the clavarioid or club fungi. It produces tubular, unbranched, white basidiocarps (fruit bodies) that typically grow in clusters. The fruit bodies can reach dimensions of 15 cm (5.9 in) t

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/94851469

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iNaturalist

Common Stump Brittlestem (Psathyrella piluliformis)

Psathyrella piluliformis is a species of agaric fungus in the family Psathyrellaceae. It produces fruit bodies (mushrooms) with broadly convex caps measuring 2–5 cm (0.8–2.0 inches) in diameter. The caps are chestnut to reddish brown, the color fading in age and with dry weather. The closely spaced Gills have an adnate attachment to the stipe. They are initially tan until the spores mature, when the gills turn dark brown. Fragments of the partial veil may remain on…

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/94851197

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iNaturalist

Golden Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius)

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/94850939

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Mycology

Queensland man rescued after 18 days says he was trying to take shortcut home

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/jan/25/queensland-man-rescued-after-18-days-says-he-was-trying-to-take-shortcut-home

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Mycology

Australia man missing for 18 days ‘survived on mushrooms’

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-55785789

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Mycology

It’s morel season! Here’s how to find edible plants and mushrooms in urban places – Greater Greater Washington DC

Since morel season is upon us—amidst a warm spell and blooming dogwoods and lilacs—I set out to learn more about this elusive mushroom. It is one of the few edible mushrooms that grow in the spring, and believe it or not, it’s possible to find them in an urban environment.

— Read on ggwash.org/view/71815/foraging-season-has-begun-heres-how-to-find-edible-mushrooms-in-the-region