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Witch’s Hat (Hygrocybe conica)

Hygrocybe conica, commonly known as the witch’s hat, conical wax cap or conical slimy cap, is a colourful member of the genus Hygrocybe (the waxcaps), found across northern Europe and North America. Originally described as Hygrophorus conicus, it may be a complex of closely related and similar species.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/98030270

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Orange Pinwheel (Marasmius siccus)

Marasmius siccus, or orange pinwheel, is a small orange mushroom with a “beach umbrella” cap and a light to dark stem. It is in the Marasmius genus. It is found in hardwood forests from the Rocky Mountains to the Appalachian Mountains. The gills are white. It is 3–7 centimetres (1.2–2.8 in) tall and 0.5–2.5 centimetres (0.20–0.98 in) wide.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/98029456

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Collared Calostoma (Calostoma lutescens)

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/98028826

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indigo milk cap (Lactarius indigo)

Lactarius indigo, commonly known as the indigo milk cap, the indigo (or blue) lactarius, or the blue milk mushroom, is a species of agaric fungus in the family Russulaceae. A widely distributed species, it grows naturally in eastern North America, East Asia, and Central America; it has also been reported in southern France. L. indigo grows on the ground in both deciduous and coniferous forests, where it forms mycorrhizal associations with a broad range of

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/97448638

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Tawny Grisette (Amanita fulva)

Amanita fulva, commonly called the tawny grisette, is a basidiomycete mushroom of the genus Amanita. It is found frequently in deciduous and coniferous forests of Europe, and possibly North America.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/96395574

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Eastern Black Trumpet (Craterellus fallax)

Craterellus fallax is a species of “black trumpets” that occurs in Eastern North America where it replaces the European taxon Craterellus cornucopioides. C. fallax can also be separated by its yellow-orange spore print, where Craterellus cornucopioides has a white spore print.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/96395352

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golden reishi (Ganoderma curtisii)

Ganoderma curtisii is a wood-decaying polypore whose distribution is primarily in the Southeastern United States. Craig and Levetin claim to have observed it in Oklahoma.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95776873

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yellow-tipped coral fungus (Ramaria formosa)

Ramaria formosa, commonly known as the beautiful clavaria, handsome clavaria, yellow-tipped- or pink coral fungus, is a coral fungus found in Asia, Europe and North America. It is widely held to be mildly poisonous if consumed, giving rise to acute gastrointestinal symptoms of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and colicky pain. It is a pinkish, much-branched coral-shape reaching some 20 cm (8 in) high. Some forms collected in North America often lack the bitter

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95776016

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Ruby Bolete (Hortiboletus rubellus)

Hortiboletus rubellus, commonly known as the ruby bolete, is a small, dainty, brightly coloured member of the family Boletaceae, with a reddish cap and stipe, and yellow pores. Like many boletes, it stains blue when cut or bruised. It is found in deciduous woodland in autumn. There is some question over its edibility, and it is reportedly of poor quality with a taste of soap. Until 2015, the species was known as Boletus rubellus.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95180201

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Amethyst Deceiver (Laccaria amethystina)

Laccaria amethystina, commonly known as the amethyst deceiver, is a small brightly colored mushroom, that grows in deciduous as well as coniferous forests. The mushroom itself is edible, but can absorb arsenic from the soil. Because its bright amethyst coloration fades with age and weathering, it becomes difficult to identify, hence the common name ‘Deceiver’. This common name is shared with its close relation Laccaria laccata that also fades and weathers. It is found

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/95179058