boletes (Boletaceae)

The Boletaceae are a family of mushrooms, primarily characterized by developing their spores in small pores on the underside of the mushroom, instead of gills, as are found in agarics. Nearly as widely distributed as agarics, they include the Cep or King Bolete (Boletus edulis), highly sought by mushroom hunters. As a whole, the typical members of the family are commonly known as boletes.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/135696903

White-Pored Chicken of the Woods (Laetiporus cincinnatus)

Laetiporus sulphureus is a species of bracket fungus (fungi that grow on trees) found in Europe and North America. Its common names are crab-of-the-woods, sulphur polypore, sulphur shelf, and chicken-of-the-woods. Its fruit bodies grow as striking golden-yellow shelf-like structures on tree trunks and branches. Old fruitbodies fade to pale beige or pale grey. The undersurface of the fruit body is made up of tubelike pores rather than gills.

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/132465456

violet coral fungus (Clavaria zollingeri)

Clavaria zollingeri, commonly known as the violet coral or the magenta coral, is a widely distributed species of fungus. It produces striking tubular, purple to pinkish-violet fruit bodies that grow up to 10 cm (3.9 in) tall and 7 cm (2.8 in) wide. The extreme tips of the fragile, slender branches are usually rounded and brownish. A typical member of the clavarioid or club fungi, Clavaria zollingeri is saprobic, and so derives nutrients by breaking down organic

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/131079169

False Caesar’s Mushroom (Amanita parcivolvata)

Amanita parcivolvata is a fungus that produces fruit bodies that vaguely resemble those of Amanita muscaria. It is differentiated, however, by its lack of an annulus, by the volval deposits on its stipe/base, and by its pileal striations. It occasionally lacks a stipe bulb entirely, instead just tapering to a point in the ground with powdery volval deposits on its surface. It ranges from 3–12 cm (1.2–4.7 in) in length and is occasional to common in the Southeastern…

Source: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/131006263